Stretch before you begin the class or exercise. Just as you would before any other form of exercise, you should do some light stretching to warm before you begin to pole dance. Stand straight and then bend down to touch your toes, roll your neck and shoulders, and stretch your hamstrings by pulling one foot back with your toes touching your butt until you feel a nice stretch on each hamstring.[6]
Pole dancing is a full-body workout. It is resistance training and cardio in one. Flexibility is improved as well. Pole dancers perform acrobatic tricks either suspending their weight or propelling it around a metal pole. The simple act of climbing a pole is an incredible display of strength. It is no surprise, then, that most pole dancers insist they have never looked or felt better. Natasha Wang is a world champion pole dancer who didn’t even start until age 29. Greta Pontarelli is a champion pole dancer at age 63—and she only began a few years ago.
Pole dance requires significant muscular endurance and coordination (as well as sensuality, in exotic dancing). Today, pole performances by exotic dancers range from basic spins and striptease in more intimate clubs, to athletic moves such as climbs and body inversions in the "stage heavy" clubs of Las Vegas and Miami. Dancer Remy Redd at the King of Diamonds, for example, is famous for flipping herself upside down into a split and hanging from the ceiling.[2] Pole dance requires significant strength and flexibility.[3] Upper body and core strength are required to attain proficiency, proper instruction, and rigorous training is necessary.[4][5] Since the mid 2000s, promoters of pole dance fitness competitions have been trying to change peoples' perception of pole dance to include pole fitness as a non-sexual form of dance and acrobatics, and are trying to move pole into the Olympics as pole sports.
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