Pole dance in America has its roots in the "Little Egypt" traveling sideshows of the 1890s, which featured sensual "Kouta Kouta" or "Hoochie Coochie" belly dances,[9] performed mostly by Ghawazi dancers making their first appearance in America.[10] In an era where women dressed modestly in corsets, the dancers, dressed in short skirts and richly adorned in jewelry, caused quite a stir.[11][12] During the 1920s, dancers introduced pole by sensually gyrating on the wooden tent poles to attract crowds.[13]
Dance poles that are permanent are fixed to the ceiling supported by a beam located the roof and they are fixated to the floor by different brackets and bearings. The way poles are fixed to the ceiling and the floor varies by which pole brand is purchased. Portable poles are attached to a base or a portable stage and do not need to be attached to the ceiling. These poles can easily be removed, dismantled and transported into cases to different locations.[17]
Some people don't learn from from certified instructors and instead try to figure it out with an improperly installed home pole and a YouTube instructional, which is a recipe for disaster. Some people can be too eager to flip upside down. This can be especially dangerous and can lead to head or spinal cord injury. This caution isn’t meant to scare away hopefuls, but rather to encourage everyone to go through gradually progressive training.
The standard dance pole typically consists of a hollow chrome, steel, or brass pole with a circular cross section, running from floor to ceiling. Affixing at the ceiling gives more stability, but is not always realized, especially at night clubs with higher ceilings or at transportable devices.[17] In most countries,[18] including the United States, the diameter is usually 50 mm (2 inches), or the now more popular 45 mm (1.75 inches), allowing it to be gripped comfortably with one hand. In Asia, the diameter is usually 45 mm or less.[19] In Australia a 38 mm pole is popular.[18]

Slide down the pole. You can slide down using the basic fireman slide, which means just holding onto the pole with your arms and legs as you slide. Or, you can hold on to the pole with your hands and release your legs just for a moment. Bring them out in front of you and rock your hips as you move your legs down to the ground. This method will take a bit longer to master but it will look and feel fantastic.[17]


Choose a location. More and more gyms are offering pole dancing classes as a creative way to get fit. Call yours to see if they offer one. You can also find out if fitness center chains that are known to offer pole dancing classes are in your area. Many independent teachers offer pole dancing classes in local gyms and dance studios too, so it's worth checking to see if anyone offers lessons near you.[1]
There is a certain way to hold your shoulder position, your feet, your neck, knees, elbows, hips, and so on while you execute pole spins. This posture is important for beginners to learn so they don’t get injured AND so they actually look good while they are dancing.  This proper technique is EXTREMELY important if you plan to learn how to pole dance from home.

We use cookies and similar technologies to recognise your repeat visits and preferences as well as to measure the effectiveness of campaigns and analyse traffic. To learn more about the cookies we use, including how to disable them, view our Privacy Policy. By clicking “I Accept” or “X” on this banner or continuing to use our site, you consent to the use of cookies unless you have disabled them.
Pole dancing is a full-body workout. It is resistance training and cardio in one. Flexibility is improved as well. Pole dancers perform acrobatic tricks either suspending their weight or propelling it around a metal pole. The simple act of climbing a pole is an incredible display of strength. It is no surprise, then, that most pole dancers insist they have never looked or felt better. Natasha Wang is a world champion pole dancer who didn’t even start until age 29. Greta Pontarelli is a champion pole dancer at age 63—and she only began a few years ago.

Dance poles have two different modes, spinning and static. The spinning mode is when the pole uses ball bearings to spin. This mode can be used to complete more experienced pole moves, make moves easier to complete and to add a more dramatic effect to the move. Most spinning poles can be fixed to static too. The static mode is when the pole cannot rotate and is in a fixed position. The static mode is regularly used when pole dancing is first taught as beginners have little confidence.[17]
×