Choose a location. More and more gyms are offering pole dancing classes as a creative way to get fit. Call yours to see if they offer one. You can also find out if fitness center chains that are known to offer pole dancing classes are in your area. Many independent teachers offer pole dancing classes in local gyms and dance studios too, so it's worth checking to see if anyone offers lessons near you.[1]
Choose a location. More and more gyms are offering pole dancing classes as a creative way to get fit. Call yours to see if they offer one. You can also find out if fitness center chains that are known to offer pole dancing classes are in your area. Many independent teachers offer pole dancing classes in local gyms and dance studios too, so it's worth checking to see if anyone offers lessons near you.[1]
There is a certain way to hold your shoulder position, your feet, your neck, knees, elbows, hips, and so on while you execute pole spins. This posture is important for beginners to learn so they don’t get injured AND so they actually look good while they are dancing.  This proper technique is EXTREMELY important if you plan to learn how to pole dance from home.
So, there are 6 examples of beginner pole dancing moves for beginners that you can expect to learn at the start of your pole fitness journey. Once you have these core moves perfected, you’ll be ready to progress and transition to the next level. Of course, the tricks in this article are just examples, there are hundreds of other poses, spins and transitions your instructor may teach you!
Always use a crash mat designed for pole dancing as they can protect you from some nasty falls and injuries. As you’ll be learning pole dancing at home, and not in a studio, it’s important that you take these extra precautions as there will be no one to blame but yourself if the unthinkable happens. Read our safety guide for pole dancing at home (opens in a new tab).
Always use a crash mat designed for pole dancing as they can protect you from some nasty falls and injuries. As you’ll be learning pole dancing at home, and not in a studio, it’s important that you take these extra precautions as there will be no one to blame but yourself if the unthinkable happens. Read our safety guide for pole dancing at home (opens in a new tab).
Choose a location. More and more gyms are offering pole dancing classes as a creative way to get fit. Call yours to see if they offer one. You can also find out if fitness center chains that are known to offer pole dancing classes are in your area. Many independent teachers offer pole dancing classes in local gyms and dance studios too, so it's worth checking to see if anyone offers lessons near you.[1]

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Many pole dancers manage to use a dance pole at home without the ideal amount of space, and they do so successfully. However, some moves and combos cannot be performed in smaller spaces, although it is possible to adapt your routines according to the space around you. As a beginner, it is better to be able to move as freely as possible so try your best to make space around you.

Dance poles have two different modes, spinning and static. The spinning mode is when the pole uses ball bearings to spin. This mode can be used to complete more experienced pole moves, make moves easier to complete and to add a more dramatic effect to the move. Most spinning poles can be fixed to static too. The static mode is when the pole cannot rotate and is in a fixed position. The static mode is regularly used when pole dancing is first taught as beginners have little confidence.[17]
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