Pole dancing is growing in popularity all around the world as a full-body workout. Men and women of all ages and abilities enroll in pole dancing classes in Dorchester as a part of their fitness regime, and for good reasons! Pole fitness offers a plethora of health benefits, including quickly burning calories, improving flexibility, improving blood flow, strengthening bones and jones, toning arms, abdomen, and legs, and improving your sense of balance. It’s an exciting endeavour, especially after the first time you’re able to stay on the pole. It’s important to first take classes before attempting any stunt on any pole in order to learn the fundamentals. Not to mention all the fun you’ll have being in group pole dancing class with other beginners and learning from an experienced pole dancer!

Because what we do is still considered taboo by many, there is a unique closeness that bonds us together. There are pole dancers of all professions, ethnicities, religions, cultures, sizes, and ages. I have friends all over the world because of pole dancing. I have friends who have been able to travel the world because of it. We support each other through learning new moves. We share each other’s videos. We watch each other perform. This shared interest bonds us with a special understanding.
This is another staple move for beginners to have in their repertoire. It’s also a good way to start building up your pain threshold, as this move hurts – quite a lot! You can introduce yourself to thigh-grip fairly quickly and in a controlled way, by sitting on the pole but still holding on with your hands, then you can slowly remove your hands as you build up grip strength.

Pole dance in America has its roots in the "Little Egypt" traveling sideshows of the 1890s, which featured sensual "Kouta Kouta" or "Hoochie Coochie" belly dances,[9] performed mostly by Ghawazi dancers making their first appearance in America.[10] In an era where women dressed modestly in corsets, the dancers, dressed in short skirts and richly adorned in jewelry, caused quite a stir.[11][12] During the 1920s, dancers introduced pole by sensually gyrating on the wooden tent poles to attract crowds.[13]
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