Pole dance in America has its roots in the "Little Egypt" traveling sideshows of the 1890s, which featured sensual "Kouta Kouta" or "Hoochie Coochie" belly dances,[9] performed mostly by Ghawazi dancers making their first appearance in America.[10] In an era where women dressed modestly in corsets, the dancers, dressed in short skirts and richly adorned in jewelry, caused quite a stir.[11][12] During the 1920s, dancers introduced pole by sensually gyrating on the wooden tent poles to attract crowds.[13]

Choose a location. More and more gyms are offering pole dancing classes as a creative way to get fit. Call yours to see if they offer one. You can also find out if fitness center chains that are known to offer pole dancing classes are in your area. Many independent teachers offer pole dancing classes in local gyms and dance studios too, so it's worth checking to see if anyone offers lessons near you.[1]

Slide down the pole. You can slide down using the basic fireman slide, which means just holding onto the pole with your arms and legs as you slide. Or, you can hold on to the pole with your hands and release your legs just for a moment. Bring them out in front of you and rock your hips as you move your legs down to the ground. This method will take a bit longer to master but it will look and feel fantastic.[17]
Some people don't learn from from certified instructors and instead try to figure it out with an improperly installed home pole and a YouTube instructional, which is a recipe for disaster. Some people can be too eager to flip upside down. This can be especially dangerous and can lead to head or spinal cord injury. This caution isn’t meant to scare away hopefuls, but rather to encourage everyone to go through gradually progressive training.
Grab the pole with both hands. Stand next to the pole so that it's closer to your weaker side. Then, place both of your hands on the pole so you're gripping it like a baseball bat, with your hands a bit more than 1 foot (30 cm) apart. Put the hand closest to the pole on top, and the outside hand on the bottom. Your lower hand should be at about chest level.[18]
Grab the pole with both hands. Stand next to the pole so that it's closer to your weaker side. Then, place both of your hands on the pole so you're gripping it like a baseball bat, with your hands a bit more than 1 foot (30 cm) apart. Put the hand closest to the pole on top, and the outside hand on the bottom. Your lower hand should be at about chest level.[18]
“I don’t have enough upper body strength.” is one of the excuses often heard for not trying pole dancing. Hardly anyone starts off with all the skills and strength required for advanced pole dancing! Start with a few taster pole dancing classes in Dorchester and see how you like it. Progress only comes with practice, and if you don’t try you’ll never improve!
I am still surprised that people don't understand this concept. In order for skin to grip the pole, pole dancers must have their legs, arms and stomach exposed. This is a safety concern. There are some grounded spins, poses, and floor work that can be performed while wearing pants. But in order to perform more advanced moves, we must have the proper amount of skin exposure. Most pole dancers do not have an issue with this at all, since our focus turns away from what our bodies look like and onto what they can do.
I am still surprised that people don't understand this concept. In order for skin to grip the pole, pole dancers must have their legs, arms and stomach exposed. This is a safety concern. There are some grounded spins, poses, and floor work that can be performed while wearing pants. But in order to perform more advanced moves, we must have the proper amount of skin exposure. Most pole dancers do not have an issue with this at all, since our focus turns away from what our bodies look like and onto what they can do.
Dance poles have two different modes, spinning and static. The spinning mode is when the pole uses ball bearings to spin. This mode can be used to complete more experienced pole moves, make moves easier to complete and to add a more dramatic effect to the move. Most spinning poles can be fixed to static too. The static mode is when the pole cannot rotate and is in a fixed position. The static mode is regularly used when pole dancing is first taught as beginners have little confidence.[17]
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