Grab the pole with both hands. Stand next to the pole so that it's closer to your weaker side. Then, place both of your hands on the pole so you're gripping it like a baseball bat, with your hands a bit more than 1 foot (30 cm) apart. Put the hand closest to the pole on top, and the outside hand on the bottom. Your lower hand should be at about chest level.[18]
Whether at home or at a dance studio, pole dancing classes are great for fitness, confidence, empowerment, and self-expression. Step outside of your comfort zone for an experience that’ll have you hooked for more. While building your self-confidence and inner strength, you’ll also be losing weight and toning your body. Your inner beauty is what makes you unique and our philosophy is that the pole is the tool to help showcase that beauty that would otherwise lie dormant. 
A back hook spin is another classic spin that’s great for spinning with a lot of momentum all the way down to the floor on a static pole. As a beginner, it’s important to learn all these different grips for spins and holds, it can be confusing at first when you’re trying to configure your arms and legs in the right position, but you’ll be surprised at natural it feels when you get it right
This is quite possibly the most irritating argument I hear against wanting to try pole dancing. There will always be hundreds of reasons not to try. Maybe you aren’t at your ideal weight, or you have two left feet, or you think you're too old. Why not stop creating roadblocks? You'll build skills as you grow and learn. That is part of what's so inspiring and empowering about it.
Dance poles have two different modes, spinning and static. The spinning mode is when the pole uses ball bearings to spin. This mode can be used to complete more experienced pole moves, make moves easier to complete and to add a more dramatic effect to the move. Most spinning poles can be fixed to static too. The static mode is when the pole cannot rotate and is in a fixed position. The static mode is regularly used when pole dancing is first taught as beginners have little confidence.[17]
A back hook spin is another classic spin that’s great for spinning with a lot of momentum all the way down to the floor on a static pole. As a beginner, it’s important to learn all these different grips for spins and holds, it can be confusing at first when you’re trying to configure your arms and legs in the right position, but you’ll be surprised at natural it feels when you get it right
This is quite possibly the most irritating argument I hear against wanting to try pole dancing. There will always be hundreds of reasons not to try. Maybe you aren’t at your ideal weight, or you have two left feet, or you think you're too old. Why not stop creating roadblocks? You'll build skills as you grow and learn. That is part of what's so inspiring and empowering about it.
Grab the pole with your dominant hand. Start by standing slightly behind the pole on the side of your dominant hand. Position your inside foot close to the base of the pole. Use your dominant hand to grab the pole at about head height. Allow your arm to straighten so that your weight is hanging away from the pole. Keep your other hand down during this time.[7]
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I am still surprised that people don't understand this concept. In order for skin to grip the pole, pole dancers must have their legs, arms and stomach exposed. This is a safety concern. There are some grounded spins, poses, and floor work that can be performed while wearing pants. But in order to perform more advanced moves, we must have the proper amount of skin exposure. Most pole dancers do not have an issue with this at all, since our focus turns away from what our bodies look like and onto what they can do.

Pole dance in America has its roots in the "Little Egypt" traveling sideshows of the 1890s, which featured sensual "Kouta Kouta" or "Hoochie Coochie" belly dances,[9] performed mostly by Ghawazi dancers making their first appearance in America.[10] In an era where women dressed modestly in corsets, the dancers, dressed in short skirts and richly adorned in jewelry, caused quite a stir.[11][12] During the 1920s, dancers introduced pole by sensually gyrating on the wooden tent poles to attract crowds.[13]

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