This is another staple move for beginners to have in their repertoire. It’s also a good way to start building up your pain threshold, as this move hurts – quite a lot! You can introduce yourself to thigh-grip fairly quickly and in a controlled way, by sitting on the pole but still holding on with your hands, then you can slowly remove your hands as you build up grip strength.
Pole dance from home. If you want to pole dance in the comforts of your own home, then get a free-standing pole that you can install in your home after carefully following the instructions. The pole should be completely fitted to your ceiling and floor and should be secured in a place that gives you lots of space to move around. Test the security of the pole before use.[3]
This is quite possibly the most irritating argument I hear against wanting to try pole dancing. There will always be hundreds of reasons not to try. Maybe you aren’t at your ideal weight, or you have two left feet, or you think you're too old. Why not stop creating roadblocks? You'll build skills as you grow and learn. That is part of what's so inspiring and empowering about it.

So, there are 6 examples of beginner pole dancing moves for beginners that you can expect to learn at the start of your pole fitness journey. Once you have these core moves perfected, you’ll be ready to progress and transition to the next level. Of course, the tricks in this article are just examples, there are hundreds of other poses, spins and transitions your instructor may teach you!

In 2016, Daily Dot[51] ran a story which covered the attempt by some pole dancers to distance themselves from strippers, with their story "Strippers Talk Back to the hashtag #Notastripper". The story utilized the hashtag "yes a stripper" in support of the origins of pole dance. On the social media platform Instagram, some pole dancers try to differentiate between their exercise method, and the origin of the method, by using "not a stripper" as a hashtag. The hashtag can be viewed as derogatory, and pole dancing strippers utilize "yes a stripper" as a defense against the denigration of their style of dance, which is created and used in strip clubs.
The use of pole for sports and exercise has been traced back at least eight hundred years to the traditional Indian sport of mallakhamb, which utilizes principles of endurance and strength using a wooden pole, wider in diameter than a modern standard pole. The Chinese pole, originating in India, uses two poles on which men would perform "gravity defying tricks" as they leap from pole to pole, at approximately twenty feet in the air, further information can be seen in the old vintage documentary series of mallakhamb, by yasho purush film on YouTube.[8]
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