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Whether at home or at a dance studio, pole dancing classes are great for fitness, confidence, empowerment, and self-expression. Step outside of your comfort zone for an experience that’ll have you hooked for more. While building your self-confidence and inner strength, you’ll also be losing weight and toning your body. Your inner beauty is what makes you unique and our philosophy is that the pole is the tool to help showcase that beauty that would otherwise lie dormant. 
A wide range of amateur and professional competitions are held in many countries around the world. They are strictly non-nude and focus on pole dance as an athletic and artistic form of dance and fitness. The first "Miss Pole Dance World" competition was held in November 2005 in Amsterdam and Elena Gibson from the UK won the championship. The following day Elena was disqualified by the organizer John Benner amongst much controversy and the title went to the runner up Reiko Suemune from Japan.[citation needed]

Because what we do is still considered taboo by many, there is a unique closeness that bonds us together. There are pole dancers of all professions, ethnicities, religions, cultures, sizes, and ages. I have friends all over the world because of pole dancing. I have friends who have been able to travel the world because of it. We support each other through learning new moves. We share each other’s videos. We watch each other perform. This shared interest bonds us with a special understanding.
Everyone has to start at the beginning, right? If you’ve recently signed up to pole fitness classes, you’re probably already fixated by pole fitness superstars on YouTube and Instagram. All of these dancers started by learning some basic pole tricks, just like you! This article contains some classic pole dancing moves for beginners that you’ll probably learn very early along your pole fitness journey.
So you’ve decided to take a pole dance class – great! The first thing you should know is that you’re going to need to wear as little clothing as possible (or as you’re comfortable with). The reason skin needs to be exposed during pole dancing classes in Dorchester is because it helps you grip the pole with different parts of your body. The most important areas to keep free of clothing are the backs of the knees and elbows, lower legs, and feet. You can expect to come out of a class with a few bruises, but you’ll be wearing them as a badge of honor for learning new moves!
Stretch before you begin the class or exercise. Just as you would before any other form of exercise, you should do some light stretching to warm before you begin to pole dance. Stand straight and then bend down to touch your toes, roll your neck and shoulders, and stretch your hamstrings by pulling one foot back with your toes touching your butt until you feel a nice stretch on each hamstring.[6]
Despite progress in the public’s understanding of what we do, many of us still fight stereotypes. Some of pole dancing’s loudest critics have never tried it themselves. Just last year, Marina Heck, a schoolteacher, was forced to resign from her position following controversy that she is a pole dancer. Even if what we are doing is completely athletic and far removed from the type of pole dancing performed in strip clubs, we still need to explain ourselves. Many times when revealing to strangers what it is I do, I find myself hesitating because I don’t feel like justifying my passion to a skeptic.
The standard dance pole typically consists of a hollow chrome, steel, or brass pole with a circular cross section, running from floor to ceiling. Affixing at the ceiling gives more stability, but is not always realized, especially at night clubs with higher ceilings or at transportable devices.[17] In most countries,[18] including the United States, the diameter is usually 50 mm (2 inches), or the now more popular 45 mm (1.75 inches), allowing it to be gripped comfortably with one hand. In Asia, the diameter is usually 45 mm or less.[19] In Australia a 38 mm pole is popular.[18]
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