Many pole dancers manage to use a dance pole at home without the ideal amount of space, and they do so successfully. However, some moves and combos cannot be performed in smaller spaces, although it is possible to adapt your routines according to the space around you. As a beginner, it is better to be able to move as freely as possible so try your best to make space around you.
This is another staple move for beginners to have in their repertoire. It’s also a good way to start building up your pain threshold, as this move hurts – quite a lot! You can introduce yourself to thigh-grip fairly quickly and in a controlled way, by sitting on the pole but still holding on with your hands, then you can slowly remove your hands as you build up grip strength.

Choose a location. More and more gyms are offering pole dancing classes as a creative way to get fit. Call yours to see if they offer one. You can also find out if fitness center chains that are known to offer pole dancing classes are in your area. Many independent teachers offer pole dancing classes in local gyms and dance studios too, so it's worth checking to see if anyone offers lessons near you.[1]
After you have learned 3 or 4 individual pole moves, for example, some common beginner pole moves are the fireman, knee spin, back hook spin, front hook spin, and the martini pole move.   Once you understand those pole moves, then you can try to combine them into a fun pole dancing routine to your favorite music.   If you aren’t a great choreographer, you can learn this pole dancing routine for beginner in this video step by step at home:
Pole dancing is growing in popularity all around the world as a full-body workout. Men and women of all ages and abilities enroll in pole dancing classes in Dorchester as a part of their fitness regime, and for good reasons! Pole fitness offers a plethora of health benefits, including quickly burning calories, improving flexibility, improving blood flow, strengthening bones and jones, toning arms, abdomen, and legs, and improving your sense of balance. It’s an exciting endeavour, especially after the first time you’re able to stay on the pole. It’s important to first take classes before attempting any stunt on any pole in order to learn the fundamentals. Not to mention all the fun you’ll have being in group pole dancing class with other beginners and learning from an experienced pole dancer!
I started Polepeople in 2003 and have never looked back. My inspiration was to establish pole dancing as a life enhancing way of exercising and an amazing, challenging skill. Pole Fitness can be so many things – at Polepeople, we celebrate it as a dancey, acrobatic, sporty, sensual and artistic way of getting fit. Come and join us for a class and discover what its all about!
Stretch before you begin the class or exercise. Just as you would before any other form of exercise, you should do some light stretching to warm before you begin to pole dance. Stand straight and then bend down to touch your toes, roll your neck and shoulders, and stretch your hamstrings by pulling one foot back with your toes touching your butt until you feel a nice stretch on each hamstring.[6]
Slide down the pole. You can slide down using the basic fireman slide, which means just holding onto the pole with your arms and legs as you slide. Or, you can hold on to the pole with your hands and release your legs just for a moment. Bring them out in front of you and rock your hips as you move your legs down to the ground. This method will take a bit longer to master but it will look and feel fantastic.[17]
I started Polepeople in 2003 and have never looked back. My inspiration was to establish pole dancing as a life enhancing way of exercising and an amazing, challenging skill. Pole Fitness can be so many things – at Polepeople, we celebrate it as a dancey, acrobatic, sporty, sensual and artistic way of getting fit. Come and join us for a class and discover what its all about!
The standard dance pole typically consists of a hollow chrome, steel, or brass pole with a circular cross section, running from floor to ceiling. Affixing at the ceiling gives more stability, but is not always realized, especially at night clubs with higher ceilings or at transportable devices.[17] In most countries,[18] including the United States, the diameter is usually 50 mm (2 inches), or the now more popular 45 mm (1.75 inches), allowing it to be gripped comfortably with one hand. In Asia, the diameter is usually 45 mm or less.[19] In Australia a 38 mm pole is popular.[18]
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