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Despite progress in the public’s understanding of what we do, many of us still fight stereotypes. Some of pole dancing’s loudest critics have never tried it themselves. Just last year, Marina Heck, a schoolteacher, was forced to resign from her position following controversy that she is a pole dancer. Even if what we are doing is completely athletic and far removed from the type of pole dancing performed in strip clubs, we still need to explain ourselves. Many times when revealing to strangers what it is I do, I find myself hesitating because I don’t feel like justifying my passion to a skeptic.

So you’ve decided to take a pole dance class – great! The first thing you should know is that you’re going to need to wear as little clothing as possible (or as you’re comfortable with). The reason skin needs to be exposed during pole dancing classes in Dorchester is because it helps you grip the pole with different parts of your body. The most important areas to keep free of clothing are the backs of the knees and elbows, lower legs, and feet. You can expect to come out of a class with a few bruises, but you’ll be wearing them as a badge of honor for learning new moves!


Slide down the pole. You can slide down using the basic fireman slide, which means just holding onto the pole with your arms and legs as you slide. Or, you can hold on to the pole with your hands and release your legs just for a moment. Bring them out in front of you and rock your hips as you move your legs down to the ground. This method will take a bit longer to master but it will look and feel fantastic.[17]

In 2016, Daily Dot[51] ran a story which covered the attempt by some pole dancers to distance themselves from strippers, with their story "Strippers Talk Back to the hashtag #Notastripper". The story utilized the hashtag "yes a stripper" in support of the origins of pole dance. On the social media platform Instagram, some pole dancers try to differentiate between their exercise method, and the origin of the method, by using "not a stripper" as a hashtag. The hashtag can be viewed as derogatory, and pole dancing strippers utilize "yes a stripper" as a defense against the denigration of their style of dance, which is created and used in strip clubs.


Pole dancing is a full-body workout. It is resistance training and cardio in one. Flexibility is improved as well. Pole dancers perform acrobatic tricks either suspending their weight or propelling it around a metal pole. The simple act of climbing a pole is an incredible display of strength. It is no surprise, then, that most pole dancers insist they have never looked or felt better. Natasha Wang is a world champion pole dancer who didn’t even start until age 29. Greta Pontarelli is a champion pole dancer at age 63—and she only began a few years ago.
Wrap your leg around the pole. Bring up the leg on the same side of your body as the hand that is holding the pole. Then, bring your leg up to the pole as you wrap your other hand around it. Flex your foot and place it on one side of the pole, with your knee on the other side. You'll need to use this leg to really anchor yourself to the pole, and create a sturdy base for your other foot to land on.[13]
I started Polepeople in 2003 and have never looked back. My inspiration was to establish pole dancing as a life enhancing way of exercising and an amazing, challenging skill. Pole Fitness can be so many things – at Polepeople, we celebrate it as a dancey, acrobatic, sporty, sensual and artistic way of getting fit. Come and join us for a class and discover what its all about!
Because what we do is still considered taboo by many, there is a unique closeness that bonds us together. There are pole dancers of all professions, ethnicities, religions, cultures, sizes, and ages. I have friends all over the world because of pole dancing. I have friends who have been able to travel the world because of it. We support each other through learning new moves. We share each other’s videos. We watch each other perform. This shared interest bonds us with a special understanding.
The standard dance pole typically consists of a hollow chrome, steel, or brass pole with a circular cross section, running from floor to ceiling. Affixing at the ceiling gives more stability, but is not always realized, especially at night clubs with higher ceilings or at transportable devices.[17] In most countries,[18] including the United States, the diameter is usually 50 mm (2 inches), or the now more popular 45 mm (1.75 inches), allowing it to be gripped comfortably with one hand. In Asia, the diameter is usually 45 mm or less.[19] In Australia a 38 mm pole is popular.[18]
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