A back hook spin is another classic spin that’s great for spinning with a lot of momentum all the way down to the floor on a static pole. As a beginner, it’s important to learn all these different grips for spins and holds, it can be confusing at first when you’re trying to configure your arms and legs in the right position, but you’ll be surprised at natural it feels when you get it right


This is one of the biggest reasons I've stuck with pole dancing as long as I have. The physical benefits are great, but the feeling you get from mastering a move or expressing a particular emotion is indescribable. Just the other day, I assisted a student in her first climb. It was a huge deal for her and the expression of joy on her face reminded me why I do what I do.
Everyone has to start at the beginning, right? If you’ve recently signed up to pole fitness classes, you’re probably already fixated by pole fitness superstars on YouTube and Instagram. All of these dancers started by learning some basic pole tricks, just like you! This article contains some classic pole dancing moves for beginners that you’ll probably learn very early along your pole fitness journey.
So if there are no classes in your area, then that might be the reason you have opted to learn how to teach yourself pole dancing at home. Another common reason people learn at home is because pole classes can be super expensive. A private class can be as high as $75 an hour and regular classes in California are as high as $260 a month (for 4 classes in a group). You can take pole dance classes at home for under $20 a month!
Pole fitness lessons may cost $20-$30 per time, and you should attend once a week to really feel the benefit. The instructor will set the pace of the lessons and choose which tricks to teach you and in what order. In The Art Of Pole DVD, for example, you learn well over 50 moves for around $120, whereas a $120 spent at a pole class would teach you fewer moves. It’s a very good value to purchase online lessons too.
Pole dance in America has its roots in the "Little Egypt" traveling sideshows of the 1890s, which featured sensual "Kouta Kouta" or "Hoochie Coochie" belly dances,[9] performed mostly by Ghawazi dancers making their first appearance in America.[10] In an era where women dressed modestly in corsets, the dancers, dressed in short skirts and richly adorned in jewelry, caused quite a stir.[11][12] During the 1920s, dancers introduced pole by sensually gyrating on the wooden tent poles to attract crowds.[13]
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