Always use a crash mat designed for pole dancing as they can protect you from some nasty falls and injuries. As you’ll be learning pole dancing at home, and not in a studio, it’s important that you take these extra precautions as there will be no one to blame but yourself if the unthinkable happens. Read our safety guide for pole dancing at home (opens in a new tab).
(Last Updated On: July 6, 2018) The very first thing you will need to learn pole dancing at home or to do a pole dancing workout at home is a dance pole. However, there are other things to consider when you are setting up your workout space at home. When you go to the gym … Continue reading Setting Up A Dance Pole & A Pole Dancing Workout Space In Your Home

Wear clothing that exposes your skin and arms. As you prepare to pole dance, wear comfortable clothes that expose your arms and legs. Baring your skin will allow you to get a much better grip on the pole with your arms and legs so that you can perform these moves safely. You can wear heels if you're comfortable with the pole and want to feel sexy. If you’re new to pole dancing, wear sneakers to get a good grip on the pole.[4]
Dance poles that are permanent are fixed to the ceiling supported by a beam located the roof and they are fixated to the floor by different brackets and bearings. The way poles are fixed to the ceiling and the floor varies by which pole brand is purchased. Portable poles are attached to a base or a portable stage and do not need to be attached to the ceiling. These poles can easily be removed, dismantled and transported into cases to different locations.[17]
Stretch before you begin the class or exercise. Just as you would before any other form of exercise, you should do some light stretching to warm before you begin to pole dance. Stand straight and then bend down to touch your toes, roll your neck and shoulders, and stretch your hamstrings by pulling one foot back with your toes touching your butt until you feel a nice stretch on each hamstring.[6]
Grab the pole with both hands. Stand next to the pole so that it's closer to your weaker side. Then, place both of your hands on the pole so you're gripping it like a baseball bat, with your hands a bit more than 1 foot (30 cm) apart. Put the hand closest to the pole on top, and the outside hand on the bottom. Your lower hand should be at about chest level.[18]

This is quite possibly the most irritating argument I hear against wanting to try pole dancing. There will always be hundreds of reasons not to try. Maybe you aren’t at your ideal weight, or you have two left feet, or you think you're too old. Why not stop creating roadblocks? You'll build skills as you grow and learn. That is part of what's so inspiring and empowering about it.


(Last Updated On: April 19, 2019) One of the toughest parts for beginners when they are learning to pole dance at home is the inner thigh grip.  It’s painful when you first learn! In fact, it’s so painful that some woman wonder if they should give up on their pole fitness dreams and Im here … Continue reading Learn How To Do Plank Scissor Leg Pole Move | Online Pole Dancing Lesson

“I don’t have enough upper body strength.” is one of the excuses often heard for not trying pole dancing. Hardly anyone starts off with all the skills and strength required for advanced pole dancing! Start with a few taster pole dancing classes in Dorchester and see how you like it. Progress only comes with practice, and if you don’t try you’ll never improve!

This is another staple move for beginners to have in their repertoire. It’s also a good way to start building up your pain threshold, as this move hurts – quite a lot! You can introduce yourself to thigh-grip fairly quickly and in a controlled way, by sitting on the pole but still holding on with your hands, then you can slowly remove your hands as you build up grip strength.
Pole dancing has gained popularity as a form of exercise with increased awareness of the benefits to general strength and fitness. These forms of exercise increases core and general body strength by using the body itself as resistance, while toning the body as a whole. A typical pole dance exercise regimen in class begins with strength training, dance-based moves, squats, push-ups, and sit-ups and gradually works its way up to the spins, climbs and inversions which are the métier of the exercise. Pole dancing is also generally reported by its schools to be empowering for women in terms of building self-confidence, in terms of which its erotic components are still the subject of some controversy.[24] Some feminists argue that sexualized dancing of this kind cannot be seen as empowering because the choice to participate is not made in freedom from constraining power structures, especially given the performative aspect of many classes.[citation needed]
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