Many pole dancers manage to use a dance pole at home without the ideal amount of space, and they do so successfully. However, some moves and combos cannot be performed in smaller spaces, although it is possible to adapt your routines according to the space around you. As a beginner, it is better to be able to move as freely as possible so try your best to make space around you.
Choose a location. More and more gyms are offering pole dancing classes as a creative way to get fit. Call yours to see if they offer one. You can also find out if fitness center chains that are known to offer pole dancing classes are in your area. Many independent teachers offer pole dancing classes in local gyms and dance studios too, so it's worth checking to see if anyone offers lessons near you.[1]

“I don’t have enough upper body strength.” is one of the excuses often heard for not trying pole dancing. Hardly anyone starts off with all the skills and strength required for advanced pole dancing! Start with a few taster pole dancing classes in Dorchester and see how you like it. Progress only comes with practice, and if you don’t try you’ll never improve!


Pole dance in America has its roots in the "Little Egypt" traveling sideshows of the 1890s, which featured sensual "Kouta Kouta" or "Hoochie Coochie" belly dances,[9] performed mostly by Ghawazi dancers making their first appearance in America.[10] In an era where women dressed modestly in corsets, the dancers, dressed in short skirts and richly adorned in jewelry, caused quite a stir.[11][12] During the 1920s, dancers introduced pole by sensually gyrating on the wooden tent poles to attract crowds.[13]
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