(Last Updated On: April 19, 2019) When people first begin learning to pole dance, the very first frustration is getting enough grip on the pole.   Beginners need a good grip to simply hold their own body weight on the pole and then eventually do basic pole spins and graduating into more advance pole dancing routines. … Continue reading Getting Started With Pole Dancing Grip Aids For Beginners
Many pole dancers manage to use a dance pole at home without the ideal amount of space, and they do so successfully. However, some moves and combos cannot be performed in smaller spaces, although it is possible to adapt your routines according to the space around you. As a beginner, it is better to be able to move as freely as possible so try your best to make space around you.

Always use a crash mat designed for pole dancing as they can protect you from some nasty falls and injuries. As you’ll be learning pole dancing at home, and not in a studio, it’s important that you take these extra precautions as there will be no one to blame but yourself if the unthinkable happens. Read our safety guide for pole dancing at home (opens in a new tab).
We use cookies and similar technologies to recognise your repeat visits and preferences as well as to measure the effectiveness of campaigns and analyse traffic. To learn more about the cookies we use, including how to disable them, view our Privacy Policy. By clicking “I Accept” or “X” on this banner or continuing to use our site, you consent to the use of cookies unless you have disabled them.
After you have learned 3 or 4 individual pole moves, for example, some common beginner pole moves are the fireman, knee spin, back hook spin, front hook spin, and the martini pole move.   Once you understand those pole moves, then you can try to combine them into a fun pole dancing routine to your favorite music.   If you aren’t a great choreographer, you can learn this pole dancing routine for beginner in this video step by step at home:
A back hook spin is another classic spin that’s great for spinning with a lot of momentum all the way down to the floor on a static pole. As a beginner, it’s important to learn all these different grips for spins and holds, it can be confusing at first when you’re trying to configure your arms and legs in the right position, but you’ll be surprised at natural it feels when you get it right
Dance poles have two different modes, spinning and static. The spinning mode is when the pole uses ball bearings to spin. This mode can be used to complete more experienced pole moves, make moves easier to complete and to add a more dramatic effect to the move. Most spinning poles can be fixed to static too. The static mode is when the pole cannot rotate and is in a fixed position. The static mode is regularly used when pole dancing is first taught as beginners have little confidence.[17]
Pole dance in America has its roots in the "Little Egypt" traveling sideshows of the 1890s, which featured sensual "Kouta Kouta" or "Hoochie Coochie" belly dances,[9] performed mostly by Ghawazi dancers making their first appearance in America.[10] In an era where women dressed modestly in corsets, the dancers, dressed in short skirts and richly adorned in jewelry, caused quite a stir.[11][12] During the 1920s, dancers introduced pole by sensually gyrating on the wooden tent poles to attract crowds.[13]
×