This is quite possibly the most irritating argument I hear against wanting to try pole dancing. There will always be hundreds of reasons not to try. Maybe you aren’t at your ideal weight, or you have two left feet, or you think you're too old. Why not stop creating roadblocks? You'll build skills as you grow and learn. That is part of what's so inspiring and empowering about it.

Pole dancing has gained popularity as a form of exercise with increased awareness of the benefits to general strength and fitness. These forms of exercise increases core and general body strength by using the body itself as resistance, while toning the body as a whole. A typical pole dance exercise regimen in class begins with strength training, dance-based moves, squats, push-ups, and sit-ups and gradually works its way up to the spins, climbs and inversions which are the métier of the exercise. Pole dancing is also generally reported by its schools to be empowering for women in terms of building self-confidence, in terms of which its erotic components are still the subject of some controversy.[24] Some feminists argue that sexualized dancing of this kind cannot be seen as empowering because the choice to participate is not made in freedom from constraining power structures, especially given the performative aspect of many classes.[citation needed]
There is a certain way to hold your shoulder position, your feet, your neck, knees, elbows, hips, and so on while you execute pole spins. This posture is important for beginners to learn so they don’t get injured AND so they actually look good while they are dancing.  This proper technique is EXTREMELY important if you plan to learn how to pole dance from home.
Everyone has to start at the beginning, right? If you’ve recently signed up to pole fitness classes, you’re probably already fixated by pole fitness superstars on YouTube and Instagram. All of these dancers started by learning some basic pole tricks, just like you! This article contains some classic pole dancing moves for beginners that you’ll probably learn very early along your pole fitness journey.
A back hook spin is another classic spin that’s great for spinning with a lot of momentum all the way down to the floor on a static pole. As a beginner, it’s important to learn all these different grips for spins and holds, it can be confusing at first when you’re trying to configure your arms and legs in the right position, but you’ll be surprised at natural it feels when you get it right

So, there are 6 examples of beginner pole dancing moves for beginners that you can expect to learn at the start of your pole fitness journey. Once you have these core moves perfected, you’ll be ready to progress and transition to the next level. Of course, the tricks in this article are just examples, there are hundreds of other poses, spins and transitions your instructor may teach you!
Wrap your leg around the pole. Bring up the leg on the same side of your body as the hand that is holding the pole. Then, bring your leg up to the pole as you wrap your other hand around it. Flex your foot and place it on one side of the pole, with your knee on the other side. You'll need to use this leg to really anchor yourself to the pole, and create a sturdy base for your other foot to land on.[13]

The standard dance pole typically consists of a hollow chrome, steel, or brass pole with a circular cross section, running from floor to ceiling. Affixing at the ceiling gives more stability, but is not always realized, especially at night clubs with higher ceilings or at transportable devices.[17] In most countries,[18] including the United States, the diameter is usually 50 mm (2 inches), or the now more popular 45 mm (1.75 inches), allowing it to be gripped comfortably with one hand. In Asia, the diameter is usually 45 mm or less.[19] In Australia a 38 mm pole is popular.[18]

×