Pole dancing has gained popularity as a form of exercise with increased awareness of the benefits to general strength and fitness. These forms of exercise increases core and general body strength by using the body itself as resistance, while toning the body as a whole. A typical pole dance exercise regimen in class begins with strength training, dance-based moves, squats, push-ups, and sit-ups and gradually works its way up to the spins, climbs and inversions which are the métier of the exercise. Pole dancing is also generally reported by its schools to be empowering for women in terms of building self-confidence, in terms of which its erotic components are still the subject of some controversy.[24] Some feminists argue that sexualized dancing of this kind cannot be seen as empowering because the choice to participate is not made in freedom from constraining power structures, especially given the performative aspect of many classes.[citation needed]
Slide down the pole. You can slide down using the basic fireman slide, which means just holding onto the pole with your arms and legs as you slide. Or, you can hold on to the pole with your hands and release your legs just for a moment. Bring them out in front of you and rock your hips as you move your legs down to the ground. This method will take a bit longer to master but it will look and feel fantastic.[17]
When walking around the pole, you need to pay attention to your body’s position in relation to the pole, as well as ensuring that your shoulders are rotated back and you maintain good posture. The way that you walk is important too, walking on tip-toes or wearing high heel shoes (optional for beginners) will give your legs a killer workout, as well as make you look more elegant. Keep your toes pointed too!
Many pole dancers manage to use a dance pole at home without the ideal amount of space, and they do so successfully. However, some moves and combos cannot be performed in smaller spaces, although it is possible to adapt your routines according to the space around you. As a beginner, it is better to be able to move as freely as possible so try your best to make space around you.
Wrap your leg around the pole. Bring up the leg on the same side of your body as the hand that is holding the pole. Then, bring your leg up to the pole as you wrap your other hand around it. Flex your foot and place it on one side of the pole, with your knee on the other side. You'll need to use this leg to really anchor yourself to the pole, and create a sturdy base for your other foot to land on.[13]
Grab the pole with your dominant hand. Start by standing slightly behind the pole on the side of your dominant hand. Position your inside foot close to the base of the pole. Use your dominant hand to grab the pole at about head height. Allow your arm to straighten so that your weight is hanging away from the pole. Keep your other hand down during this time.[7]
Pole fitness lessons may cost $20-$30 per time, and you should attend once a week to really feel the benefit. The instructor will set the pace of the lessons and choose which tricks to teach you and in what order. In The Art Of Pole DVD, for example, you learn well over 50 moves for around $120, whereas a $120 spent at a pole class would teach you fewer moves. It’s a very good value to purchase online lessons too.
Wrap your leg around the pole. Bring up the leg on the same side of your body as the hand that is holding the pole. Then, bring your leg up to the pole as you wrap your other hand around it. Flex your foot and place it on one side of the pole, with your knee on the other side. You'll need to use this leg to really anchor yourself to the pole, and create a sturdy base for your other foot to land on.[13]

So, there are 6 examples of beginner pole dancing moves for beginners that you can expect to learn at the start of your pole fitness journey. Once you have these core moves perfected, you’ll be ready to progress and transition to the next level. Of course, the tricks in this article are just examples, there are hundreds of other poses, spins and transitions your instructor may teach you!
Pole dance requires significant muscular endurance and coordination (as well as sensuality, in exotic dancing). Today, pole performances by exotic dancers range from basic spins and striptease in more intimate clubs, to athletic moves such as climbs and body inversions in the "stage heavy" clubs of Las Vegas and Miami. Dancer Remy Redd at the King of Diamonds, for example, is famous for flipping herself upside down into a split and hanging from the ceiling.[2] Pole dance requires significant strength and flexibility.[3] Upper body and core strength are required to attain proficiency, proper instruction, and rigorous training is necessary.[4][5] Since the mid 2000s, promoters of pole dance fitness competitions have been trying to change peoples' perception of pole dance to include pole fitness as a non-sexual form of dance and acrobatics, and are trying to move pole into the Olympics as pole sports.
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